Rules of Pitch and Putt

The Rules of Pitch and Putt - book cover

The Rules of Pitch and Putt

The official rules of pitch and putt were drafted by the FIPPA in consultation with national Pitch and Putt associations worldwide and published January 1, 2008.

The original manual stated that these are transitional Rules for the period 2008-2010 and should be read in conjunction with all updates that are published on the FIPPA website, www.fippa.net.

It also states that “FIPPA allows member associations and federations to legislate for the game in their own territory and adapt these rules accordingly for local tournaments.”

This manual follows the FIPPA rules as closely as possible substituting Canadian units of measure and Canadian rules of golf (where there are differences).

CONTENTS

THE RULES OF PITCH & PUTT

All FIPPA sanctioned competitions are to take place in accordance with these Rules.

FIPPA allows member associations and federations to legislate for the game in their own territory and adapt these rules accordingly for local tournaments.

2nd Edition, effective from 1 January 2010

These are transitional Rules for the period 2010-2013 and should be read in conjunction with all updates that are published on the FIPPA website, www.fippa.net

Pitch & Putt is an independent amateur sport controlled worldwide by FIPPA, the International Federation of Pitch & Putt.

The FIPPA Constitution defines Pitch & Putt with the following characteristics:

  1. Distances:
    1. Length of hole: Maximum of 90 metres (~100 yards).
    2. Length of 18 hole course: Maximum of 1,200 metres.
  2. Maximum of three clubs (one of which must be a Putter) permitted for use.
  3. Use of a Tee on the Teeing Ground is obligatory.
  4. The Teeing Ground for the hole to be played is common for all players

How to Use These Rules

It is recommended that you familiarise yourself with these Rules and use them whenever a question arises. If in doubt, play the course as you find it and play the ball as it lies.

Understand the Words

These Rules are written in a very precise and deliberate fashion. You should be aware of and understand the following differences in word use:

should
recomendation
must/shall
instruction (and penalty if not complied with)
the ball
means that the ball may not be exchanged for another
a ball
means that a ball may be exchanged for another

Know the Definitions

A good knowledge of the defined terms is very important for the correct application of the rules.

Penalties for breach of rules or incompliance with procedure

The penalty for a breach of a rule both in Stroke-Play and Matchplay competitions is ONE STROKE except when otherwise provided.

Dropping a ball for relief

In accordance with relief options, the ball shall be always dropped within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief, or in the place determined by the applicable rule, irrespective of whether the drop constitutes a penalty or not.

Etiquette; Bevaviour on The Course

No one should move, talk or stand close to the line of play or directly behind the ball or the hole when a player is addressing the ball or making a stroke.

No player should play until the players in front are out of range. Nevertheless, players should play without undue delay.

When the play of a hole has been completed, players should immediately leave the putting green and mark their cards at the next tee.

Players should repair their divot holes and pitch mark damage to the green.

Players should avoid damaging the hole when removing or replacing the flagstick and the removal of the ball from the hole. The head of a club should not be used to remove the ball from the hole, nor should players lean on their clubs while on the putting green.

Before leaving a bunker, players should smooth over all footprints and holes.

A serious breach of etiquette or continuous disregard of these guidelines could result in a player being disqualified.

DEFINITIONS

ADDRESSING THE BALL
The ball has been “addressed” when the player has taken the stance preparatory to making a stroke and has also grounded the club. However, in a hazard, the player has “addressed the ball” when the stance has been taken preparatory to making a stroke.
ADVICE
Advice is any counsel or suggestion that could influence a player in determining his play or method of making a stroke. Information on the rules and matters of public information is not advice.
BALL IN PLAY
A ball is ”in play” as soon as the player has made a stroke on the teeing ground. It remains in play (as the player’s ball) until holed out, except when it is out of bounds, lost or lifted or another ball has been substituted in accordance with these rules. A ball so substituted becomes the ball in play.
BALL LOST
A ball is deemed “lost” on the course

  1. if it not found or identified as his by within three minutes after the players side have begun to search for it; or
  2. the player has made a stroke with a substituted ball under the rules with the corresponding loss of distance and one stroke penalty.
BALL MOVED
A ball is deemed to have “moved” if it leaves its original position even if only a fraction of its circumference.
BUNKER
A “bunker” is a hazard consisting of an area of ground where turf or soil has been replaced with sand or the like. A wall or lip of the bunker not covered with grass is part of the bunker. The margin of the bunker extends vertically downwards, but not upwards. A ball is in a bunker when it lies in or any part of it touches the bunker.
CASUAL WATER
“Casual Water” is any temporary accumulation of water or snow or natural ice on the course that is not in a water hazard.
COMMITTEE
The “committee” is the duly nominated committee of the club or association organizing the competition. The committee has no power to waive a rule of Pitch & Putt. The committee may establish Local Rules consistent with the Rules of Pitch & Putt.
COURSE
The “course” is the whole area within which play is permitted.
ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
“Environmentally Sensitive Areas” are those areas of the course so designated and identified by stakes with red/green tops.
EQUIPMENT
“Equipment” is anything used, worn or carried by the player or playing partner.
FLAGSTICK
The “flagstick” is a movable straight indicator placed in the centre of the hole to show its position.
GROUND UNDER REPAIR
“Ground Under Repair” is any portion of the course so marked by representative. Any grass, bush, tree or anything growing within the ground under repair is part of the ground under repair. It includes material piled for removal and a hole made by a greenkeeper, even if not so marked. Stakes and lines defining “ground under repair” are within such ground. Such stakes are obstructions. A ball is in ground under repair when it lies in or any part of it touches the ground under repair. The margin of ground under repair extends vertically downwards, but not upwards. The committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from ground under repair.
HAZARDS
A “hazard” is any bunker or water hazard. A ball is in a hazard when it lies in or any part of it touches the hazard.
HOLE
The “hole” must be 108 mm in diameter and at least 101.6 mm deep. If a lining is used, it must be sunk at least 25.4 mm below the putting surface unless the nature of the soil makes it impracticable to do so.
HOLED
A ball is “holed” when it is at rest within the circumference of the hole and all of it is below the level of the lip of the hole.
LINE OF PLAY
The “line of play” is the direction that the player wishes his ball to take after a stroke, plus a reasonable distance on either side of the intended direction. The line of play extends vertically upwards from the ground, but does not extend beyond the hole.
LINE OF PUTT
The “line of putt” is the line which the player wishes his ball to take after a stroke on the Putting Green. The line of putt does not extend beyond the hole.
LOOSE IMPEDIMENTS
The term “loose impediments” denotes natural objects not fixed or growing and not adhering to the ball, and includes stones not solidly embedded, leaves, twigs, branches and the like, dung, worms, insects and casts or heaps made by them. Sand and loose soil are loose impediments on the putting green but not elsewhere. Dew and frost are not loose impediments.
MARKER
A “marker” is one who is appointed by the committee to record a competitor’s score in stroke play. He is not a referee.
NEAREST POINT OF RELIEF
The “nearest point of relief” is the point on the course, nearest to where the ball lies, which is not nearer the hole, and where there is no longer the interference from which relief is permitted.
OBSTRUCTIONS
An “obstruction” is anything artificial, whether erected, placed or left on the course except:

  1. Objects defining out of bounds such as walls, fences, stakes and railings
  2. Any obstruction declared by the committee to be an integral part of the course.
  3. Any part of an immovable artificial object that is out of bounds

An obstruction is a movable obstruction if it can be moved without unreasonable effort, without unduly delaying play and without causing damage. Otherwise, it is an immovable obstruction.

OUT OF BOUNDS
“Out of bounds” is defined by all boundary fences and play outside these boundaries is prohibited. The committee may define and mark areas within the course as out of bounds. A ball is out of bounds when all of it lies out of bounds. A player may stand out of bounds to play a ball lying within bounds. Objects defining out of bounds are not obstructions and are deemed to be fixed. The out of bounds line extends vertically upwards and downwards.
OUTSIDE AGENCY
An “outside agency” is any agency not part of the match or, in stroke play, not part of the competitor’s side. Neither wind or water is an outside agency.
PENALTY STROKE
A “penalty stroke” is one added to the score of a player or player’s side under the rules.
PRACTICE
“Practice” is defined as the deliberate striking of a ball in a manner the player may wish to replicate in the course of normal play.
PRACTICE SWING
A “practice swing” is not a practice stroke and may be taken at any place, provided the player does not breach the Rules.
PROVISIONAL BALL
A “provisional ball” is a ball played under these rules in place of a ball which may be lost outside a water hazard or may be out of bounds.
PUTTING GREEN
The “putting green” is all ground of the hole being played which is specially prepared for putting. A ball is on the putting green when any part of it touches the putting green.
REFEREE
A “referee” is one who is appointed by the Committee to accompany players to decide questions of fact and apply the rules. He must act on any breach of a Rule that he observes or is reported to him. The referee’s decision is final.
STANCE
Consists in a player placing his feet in position for and preparatory to making a stroke.
STIPULATED ROUND
The “stipulated round” consists of playing the holes of the course in their correct sequence unless otherwise authorised by the Committee.
STROKE
A “stroke” is the forward movement of the club made with the intention of striking at and moving the ball. A stroke shall be counted as soon as the downswing commences. But If a player checks his downswing voluntarily before the clubhead reaches the ball he is deemed not to have made a stroke.
TEE
A “tee” is an artificial device, designed to raise the ball off the ground. The minimum height requirement of the device is 5mm.
TEEING GROUND
The “teeing ground” is the starting place for the hole to be played and is common to all players. If the starting place is a mat, the defined area of the teeing ground is the mat itself. Otherwise, the front and sides must be defined and the back of the teeing area shall be no more than two club lengths from the front.
THROUGH THE GREEN
“Through the green” is the whole area of the course except:

  1. The teeing ground and putting green of the hole being played.
  2. All hazards on the course.
  3. Flower beds, staked trees, clearly defined vegetative areas and environmentally sensitive areas.
WATER HAZARD
A “water hazard” is any sea, lake, pond, river, ditch, surface drainage ditch or other open water course (whether containing water or not). All ground or water within the margin of a water hazard is part of the water hazard. If the margin of the water hazard is not otherwise defined, it shall be where the downward depression of the ground commences.
The margin of a water hazard extends vertically upwards and downwards. Stakes identifying water hazards and lines, beams, stones, walls, fences etc. defining the margins of water hazards are in the hazards and are deemed to be obstructions. The margin of such hazards are defined as the exterior points of the objects marking the hazard.
Stakes to identify and/or lines used to define a water hazard should be red.
Note 1. The Committee may declare any part of the course to be a water hazard and may make a local rule prohibiting play from an environmentally-sensitive area defined as a water hazard.
WRONG BALL
“Wrong Ball” is any ball other than the player’s ball in play or his provisional ball.

Part I – General Play

  1. THE GAME
    1. The game of Pitch & Putt consists of playing a ball with a club from each Teeing Ground into the associated target hole by a stroke or successive strokes in accordance with these Rules.
    2. Except as otherwise allowed by the Committee the holes must be played in sequence, commencing at the first hole.
      PENALTY: disqualification
    3. The ball shall be played as it lies, except as otherwise provided in the rules.
      PENALTY: disqualification
  2. PRACTICE
    1. On any day or days of a competition, or during the course of any format of competition itself, players must not practice within the boundaries of the course. This rule is valid both for Matchplay and Strokeplay competitions.
      PENALTY: disqualification
    2. Between the play of two holes a player must not make a practice stroke, except on the putting green of the last hole played provided he does not unduly delay play.
      PENALTY: one stroke
    3. Play in a different competition on the same day(s) does not constitute practice.
    4. Practice on a designated practice range and putting green prior to commencement of any round is permitted.
    5. Strokes played in continuing the play of a hole, the result of which has been decided, are not practice strokes.
  3. OBSTRUCTIONS

    Any movable obstruction may be removed without penalty.

    1. If the ball moves, caused by the removal of the obstruction, it must be replaced.
    2. If the ball lies in or on the obstruction, the ball may be lifted and the obstruction removed. The ball must through the green or in a hazard be dropped, or on the putting green be placed, as near as possible to the spot under the place where the ball lay in or on the obstruction, but not nearer the hole.
      PENALTY FOR BREACH OF RULE: one stroke
    3. Except when the ball is in a water hazard, a player may obtain relief when a ball comes to rest on or near an immovable obstruction so as to interfere with a player’s stance or swing.
      Procedure:
      • Through the green, lift the ball and drop without penalty within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief – though not nearer the hole.
      • Bunker, lift the ball and drop in the bunker without penalty as above.
      • Green, lift the ball and place it without penalty at the nearest point of relief.
  4. CASUAL WATER

    If a player’s ball lies in or touches casual water or when such a condition interferes with the player’s stance or swing, the player may obtain free relief.

    Procedure:

    • Through the green, lift the ball and drop without penalty within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief – though not nearer the hole.
    • Bunker, lift the ball and drop in the bunker without penalty as above.
    • Green, lift the ball and place it without penalty at the nearest point of relief.
    PENALTY: one stroke

  5. ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS
    1. A ball having entered an Environmentally Sensitive Area must not be recovered if recovery requires a player’s entry to that area.
      PENALTY FOR BREACH: one stroke
    2. A ball having entered an Environmentally Sensitive Area must be replaced by dropping a ball within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief without penalty.
    3. A ball having entered an Environmentally Sensitive Area and which is recoverable by a player without entry to that area shall be lifted and dropped within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief without penalty.
    4. If a wire barrier marking an Environmentally Sensitive Area, intervenes with a player’s line of play, the player may drop the ball within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief without penalty.
  6. GROUND UNDER REPAIR FLOWER BEDS AND STAKED TREES
    1. The Committee may declare any flower beds, clearly defined vegetative areas or staked trees (if the tree or stake interferes with the player’s stance or swing) as Ground Under Repair for the purposes of this Rule.
    2. Playing from “ground under repair” is permitted except when prohibited by a Local Rule.
    3. A ball that comes to rest in or touches a composted flower bed, clearly defined vegetative area or by a staked tree (if the tree or stake interferes with the player’s stance or swing) or Ground Under Repair, or when such a condition interferes with the player’s stance or swing, the player may obtain free relief.
      Procedure:
      • Through the green, lift the ball and drop without penalty within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief – though not nearer the hole.
      • Bunker, lift the ball and drop in the bunker without penalty as above.
      • Green, lift the ball and place it without penalty at the nearest point of relief.
    PENALTY: one stroke

  7. SAND BUNKERS
    1. Before making a stroke at the ball in a sand bunker the player must not
      • Touch the ground or the sand with a club.
      • Touch or move a loose impediment in the bunker.
      • Any movable obstruction lying in the bunker may be removed.
    2. A stroke which does not leave the ball clear of the sand is not of itself a breach of Rule, but to smooth irregularities before playing a second or any further strokes in the sand is a breach of the Rule.
    PENALTY: one stroke

  8. WATER HAZARDS
    1. A ball in a water hazard may be played without penalty, but the player must not
      • Touch the ground or water in the hazard with a club.
      • Touch or move a loose impediment in the hazard.
      • Any movable obstruction lying in the water hazard may be removed.
    2. If a ball is in or is lost in a water hazard (whether the ball lies in water or not), the player may:
      • Play a ball, as nearly as possible, to the spot from which the original ball was last played; or
      • Drop a ball behind the water hazard, keeping the point at which the original ball last crossed the margin of the water hazard directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind the water hazard the ball may be dropped.
      • Drop a ball outside the water hazard within two club-lengths of and not nearer the hole than the point where the original ball last crossed the margin of the water hazard.
      PENALTY: one stroke
  9. THE TEEING GROUND
    1. The ball must be played off the defined teeing ground or mat by placing it on a tee.
    2. If a player, when starting a hole, plays a ball from outside the teeing ground / mat, he shall incur a penalty of one stroke and shall then play a ball from within the teeing ground / mat.
    3. If the ball falls off the tee or is knocked off by the player while addressing it, it shall be re-teed without penalty. If a stroke is made at the ball in these circumstances, the stroke shall be counted and the ball played as it lies.
    PENALTY: one stroke

  10. THE PUTTING GREEN
    1. A ball on the putting green may be marked and lifted.
    2. On the putting green:
      • Loose impediment may be removed by picking it up or by brushing it aside provided that nothing is pressed down on the line of play.
      • Damage caused by the impact of the ball may be repaired.
    3. If the marker interferes with the line of play of an opponent, if so requested it should be placed one or more club head(s) length, to either side of its original position. If the marker is so placed to either side, it must be replaced in its original position before the ball is replaced.
    4. If a player’s ball when played on the putting green strikes another ball also on the putting green, the player shall incur a one stroke penalty and his ball is played as it lies. The moved ball must be replaced in the original position.
    5. The player’s ball must not strike the flagstick either placed in the hole or having been removed from the hole when the ball is played from the putting surface.
    6. A ball lying on a putting green other than that of the hole being played it must be lifted and dropped without penalty within two club-lengths of the nearest point of relief – though not nearer the hole.
    7. When any part of a ball overhangs the edge of a hole, the owner of the ball may wait 10 seconds to determine whether it is at rest. If by then the ball has not fallen in the hole, it is deemed to be at rest and shall be played accordingly.
    8. If any old hole plug interferes with the line of putt then the ball may be marked, lifted and placed at the nearest point of relief, no nearer the hole, without penalty.
      PENALTY: one stroke.
    9. No club except a putter may be used on a green except if during the normal course of play the club is damaged. The player may finish the stipulated round with either of his other clubs, or substitute the putter for another without causing undue delay.
      PENALTY FOR BREACH OF RULE: one stroke

PART II – EQUIPMENT

  1. CLUBS
    1. A player shall have a maximum of three clubs (conforming to recognised specifications)
      PENALTY: one stroke for each hole with a maximum penalty of three strokes per round
    2. One of which must be a putter.
      PENALTY: disqualification
    3. Foreign material must not be applied to the club face.
      PENALTY: disqualification
    4. A club may be replaced, without causing undue delay only if it has become unfit for use in the normal course of play. The replacement must not be made by borrowing any club which another player playing on the course has selected for play.
    5. Partners may share clubs, provided that the total number of clubs does not exceed three.
      PENALTY: one stroke for each hole with a maximum penalty of three strokes per round
  2. THE BALL
    1. The ball shall not be less than 1.68 inches (42.67mm) and must conform to recognised specifications.
    2. A ball must have the manufacturer’s name and Identification number or brand clearly legible.
    3. Foreign material must not be applied to a ball or otherwise manipulated.
      PENALTY : disqualification
    4. If a ball is damaged as a result of a stroke, the stroke is cancelled and the player must play another ball without penalty as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was played.

PART III – THE GAME

  1. PLAYING THE BALL
    1. The ball must be fairly struck at with the head of the club and must not be pushed, scooped, scraped or spooned.
    2. The first player to play from the first teeing ground / mat is decided by the order of the draw (eg: order of handicap), if there is no draw, by lots. Thereafter the side with the lowest score will play first at the next teeing ground / mat.
    3. Before commencing play (or when the ball is changed), each player should clearly identify the player’s ball to their marker/opponent.
    4. When the balls are in play, the ball furthest from the hole should be played first.
    5. A player must hole out with the ball played from the teeing ground unless a rule permits him to substitute another ball (a ball damaged, lost or irrecoverable).
    6. If a player’s club strikes the ball more than once in the course of a stroke, the player shall count the stroke and add a penalty stroke, making two strokes in all.
    7. A player shall not improve, or allow to be improved, the player’s line of play or the lie of the ball and shall not move, bend or break anything fixed or growing except as may occur in the course of fairly taking up the player’s stance.
    8. Except when either a loose impediment or the ball touches or lies in a hazard, loose impediments may be removed.
    9. A ball embedded in its own pitch mark through the green may be lifted, cleaned and dropped without penalty, as near as possible to the spot where it lay but not nearer the hole.
    10. A player may clean his ball without penalty during play of a hole if the ball has been marked and lifted
      • On the green, or
      • When plugged, or
      • Otherwise, in accordance with these Rules.

      A player may not clean his ball if the ball has been marked and lifted because it is assisting or interfering (off the green) with play or other than to the extent necessary.

      • For identification, or
      • To determine if it is unfit for play.
    11. If the position of a ball, in any place on the course, interferes with the stance, swing or line of play of another player, the ball must be marked and lifted if so requested and subsequently replaced. The ball shall not be cleaned.
    12. A player, playing from a wrong teeing ground / mat, shall cancel the shot(s) played and must play from the correct teeing ground / mat. The player shall incur a penalty of one stroke. Should the error not be rectified before play of the next hole commences, he is disqualified.
    13. If a player plays a stroke/s with a wrong ball, the player shall incur a penalty of one stroke, and then play his own ball. Should the error not be rectified before play of the next hole commences, the player shall be disqualified. Shots played with a wrong ball are not to be counted.
    14. If a ball, having been struck, is known to have gone out of bounds or to be lost, the player shall add a one stroke penalty and must play a ball as nearly as possible to the place from which the original ball was last played :
      • From the teeing ground / mat the use of a tee is obligatory.
      • From through the green or from a hazard the ball must be dropped.
      • From on the green the ball must be placed.
    15. A Provisional Ball should be played if the player considers the original ball may be lost (though not in a water hazard) or out of bounds and has so declared to the marker/opponent and identified the provisional ball to that person.
      If the original ball is in fact lost or out of bounds, the provisional ball becomes the ball in play and the player adds one penalty stroke to the score.

      If the original ball is neither lost nor out of bounds, the provisional ball must be abandoned, without penalty, and the strokes played with it shall not count. Failure to so abandon the provisional ball constitutes playing with the wrong ball.
    16. The player may deem his ball unplayable at any place on the course, except when the ball is in a water hazard. The player is the sole judge as to whether the ball is unplayable. If the ball is deemed to be unplayable, the player must, under penalty of one stroke:
      1. Play a ball as nearly as possible to the place from which the original ball was last played :
        • From the teeing ground / mat the use of a tee is obligatory.
        • From through the green or from a hazard the ball must be dropped.
        • From on the green the ball must be placed.
      2. Drop a ball behind the point where the ball lay, keeping that point directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind that point the ball may be dropped; or
      3. Drop a ball within two club-lengths of the spot where the ball lay, but not nearer the hole.

      If the unplayable ball is in a bunker, the player may proceed under clause i), ii) or iii). If playing under clause ii) or iii), a ball must be dropped in the bunker.

      PENALTY: one stroke.

  2. BALL MOVED, DEFLECTED OR STOPPED
    1. When a player’s ball in play and at rest is moved by the player, his partner or their equipment, the player shall incur a one stroke penalty and the ball must be replaced.
    2. If a ball in play and at rest, moves after the player has addressed it, the player shall be deemed to have caused it to move and shall incur a one stroke penalty, and the ball must be replaced. A ball shall be considered to have moved from its original position if it has moved only a fraction of its circumference.
    3. If a ball at rest is moved by anything not part of the play, other than wind, or by another player or his equipment, it must be replaced without penalty.
    4. If the ball moves after any loose impediment has been touched by the player or the player’s partner, it shall be replaced incurring a one stroke penalty, except on the Green where the ball must be replaced without penalty.
    5. If a ball in motion is stopped or deflected by anything not part of the play, other than wind, or by another player or his equipment, the ball shall be played as it lies.
    6. If a ball in motion is stopped or deflected by the player or the player’s partner, or their equipment, a penalty of one stroke is incurred and the ball must be played as it lies.
    7. If a ball at rest through the green is struck and moved by the ball of another player it shall be replaced at the position from which it was moved and the other ball shall be played as it lies.
      PENALTY: one stroke.
    8. A player must not take any action to influence the position or the movement of a ball except in accordance with the Rules. In the case of a serious and intentional breach of this rule, the penalty is disqualification.
  3. RELIEF SITUATIONS
    1. A ball to be dropped under the Rules shall be dropped by the player in person. The player shall stand erect, hold the ball at shoulder height and arm’s length and drop it to either side not nearer the hole.
      PENALTY: one stroke.
    2. A dropped ball must be re-dropped, without penalty, if it:
      • roles and comes to rest more than two club lengths from where it first struck a part of the course.
      • Rolls into and comes to rest in a hazard.
      • Rolls out and comes to rest outside a hazard.
      • Rolls onto and comes to rest on a green.
      • Comes to rest out of bounds.
      • Comes to rest nearer the hole.
      • Comes to rest where the initial interference still exists.

      If the ball when re-dropped comes to rest in any of the above positions, it must be placed as near as possible to the spot where it touched the ground when re-dropped.

    3. If a ball lies through the green and its position interferes with the stance or swing of another player, then the ball shall be marked. The ball must not be cleaned.
      PENALTY: one stroke.

PART IV – THE PLAYER

  1. PLAYER’S RESPONSIBILITIES
    1. The player shall start at the time laid down by the committee.
    2. The players shall remain during the round in the group arranged by the committee.
    3. The use of a caddie is not permitted at any time.
    4. The player is responsible for the correctness of the score recorded for each hole on his card. After completion of the round, the player must ensure that both he and his marker (one who records the player’s score) sign the score card and return it to the committee as soon as possible.
    5. Agreement to waive Rules: Players must not agree to exclude the application of any rule or to waive any penalty incurred.
      PENALTY: disqualification.
    6. If a player returns a score for any hole lower than actually played, or fails to record a score for any hole, the player shall be disqualified. A score higher than actually played shall stand.
    7. A player must not give / ask for advice, except to / of the player’s partner.
      PENALTY : one stroke.
    8. Players of the same group should hand in their scorecards to the competition organisation simultaneously.

PART V – GENERAL RULE

Where these rules do not provide for a specific situation, or if any point in dispute is not covered by the Rules, the Committee should, upon deliberation, make a decision in accordance with equity.

PART VI – FORMS OF PLAY

  • MATCH PLAY

    • A match consists of one side playing against another over a stipulated round unless otherwise decreed by the committee.
    • In match play the game is played by holes. A hole is won by the side that holes its ball in fewer strokes. In a handicap match the lower net score wins the hole.
    • A hole is halved if each side holes out in the same number of strokes.
    • A match is won when one side leads by a number of holes greater than the number remaining to be played.
    • A player may concede an opponent’s next stroke at any time provided the opponent’s ball is at rest. The opponent is considered to have holed out with the next stroke and the ball may be removed by either side.
    • A player may concede a hole at any time prior to the start or conclusion of that hole.
    • A player may concede a match at any time prior to the start or conclusion of that match.

    Forms of Match play:

    Single Match Play
    A match in which one player plays against another.

    Four Ball Match Play
    A match in which two players play their better ball against the better ball of two other players.

    Foursome Match Play
    A match in which two players playing as partners against two other players, and each side plays with one ball. The partners must play alternately from the teeing grounds/mats and alternately during the play of each hole.

  • STROKE PLAY

    • A Stroke Play competition consists of playing a stipulated round unless otherwise decreed by the committee.
    • The competitor or side playing the stipulated round or rounds in the fewest strokes is the winner. In a handicap competition, the competitor or side with the lowest net score for the stipulated round or rounds is the winner.

    Forms of Stroke play:

    Single Stroke Play
    A Stroke Play competition in which each player plays against the other competitors.

    Four Ball Stroke Play
    A Stroke Play competition in which two players, playing as partners, score with their better ball.

    Foursome Stroke Play
    A Stroke Play competition in which two players, playing as partners, play with one ball. The partners must play alternately from the teeing grounds/mats and alternately during the play of each hole.

    Stableford competitions
    A Stableford competition is a form of Stroke Play. The scoring in such a competition is made by points awarded in relation to a fixed score at each hole.

    Hole played in points
    More than one over fixed score or no score returned 0
    One over fixed score 1
    Fixed score 2
    One under fixed score 3
    Two under fixed score 4
    Three under fixed score 5
    Four under fixed score 6

    The winner is the competitor who scores the highest number of points.

    The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes at each hole where the competitor’s net score earns one or more points.

APPENDIX I – GUIDELINES ON AMATEUR STATUS

Pitch & Putt is essentially an amateur sport.

A player may not:

  • Compete for prize money except as provided for in Special Provision A
  • Receive payment or compensation for giving instruction other than as part of an approved programme.
  • Accept a prize or prizes of a retail value in excess of €750.
  • Exchange any prize for cash.
  • Use a prize voucher to pay for all or part of a Club subscription.
  • Accept honorary membership, or membership at a reduced rate, as an inducement to play for a Club.

A player may:

  • Enter a voulentary Sweepstake (a club members pool competition).
  • Give instruction on a voluntary basis.
  • Accept symbolic prizes which are permanently and distinctively engraved and are, therefore, exempt from the prize limit of €750.
  • Accept free food and beverage at a competition, provided the same is offered to all competitors.
  • Receive expenses for participating in team, promotional and international events.

Infringement of these guidelines will result in automatic exclusion from registration for competition. Reinstatement will only be considered by the player’s association on written application, but only after one year of the event giving rise to the loss of amateur status.

SPECIAL PROVISION A

The following Special Provision A will apply on a two-year trial basis from 01 January 2010

In FIPPA approved International Open competitions

    • The total prize fund may include accumulated cash prizes of a maximum of €2500.00
    • First prize of a maximum of €750.00 may ne awarded
    • Subsequent prizes may be awarded
  1. The decision of whether or not to award cash prizes is at the discretion of the organising committee.
  2. Cash prizes will be paid as frogg amounts and any personal taxes will be the responsibility of the individual participant. EPPA and FIPPA will not be responsible for the tax treatment in any particular jurisdiction.
  3. The participant’s levy per competing player in a FIPPA Open will be €6 in 2010 and €7 in 2011. If the organising committee decides to award cash prizes, it is entitled to retain 50% of the FIPPA participant’s levy to help defray the cost of such prizes.
  4. The organising committee may award a trophy or other form of prize if accepting a cash prize might contravene or prejidice the amateur status of a player in another sport. The organising committee will inform the participants in an international open competition of this possibility.
  5. Acceptance of cash prizes in accordance with the terms of this provision will not debar a player from participating in EPPA or FIPPA individual or team championships.

Suggested clause for domestic Constitutions:
Acceptance of cash prizes in accordance with Special Provision A of the FIPPA Rules will not be deemed a breach of amateur status.

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